Selling Work

The process of painting, making mistakes and trying new things is great fun but in the end it comes down to how much your work sells and how popular you are especially if you are wanting to make a living out of it.  Selling your work is one of the hardest things I have found.  I am very grateful for websites such as Esty which are a great platform for selling work and I have been successful there but somehow many people don’t trust buying work unless someone else says its good.  I realise that if you aren’t represented by a gallery then many people don’t recognise you as an artist.

My aim this year is to try and find a gallery who is willing to put their neck on the line and support me.  It is a very tough world out there and already walking around the area I live in, the amount of rude and hard knock backs I have had is quite an eye opener.  It’s that chicken and egg situation where they are not interested in seeing work that has been sold (even though it represents the work/style I paint) but are more interested in work that is available which then puts you in a difficult position with work hanging around your studio that you can’t put anywhere to sell.  They also have this air about them claiming that THEY find you and not the other way around.  How do I get found?

Being in a gallery also brings it’s problems as they charge around 70% per painting which hikes your prices up meaning that displaying or exhibiting in cafes etc will become more of a problem.  Sadly this isn’t a hobby for me – something I need to try to make a living out of.

This year I’m determined to work as well as I can and get some pieces ready for any gallery to take me.  It’s the Affordable Art Fair next week where I will go around and find galleries where my work might fit.

This year a gallery, next year competitions.  I have my work cut out!

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Here is a little picture for those of you who were celebrating St Davids Day.  Framed and ready to go on my Etsy site AlicesArtHouse. £200 (painting is 40cmx40cm).

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Wonderful Singer Sargent

Sargent is a hero of mine.   I find his work inspirational, exciting and so beautiful.  Most of the work I have seen are of his oil paintings and its mainly his portraits that really float my boat.  However this last week I have been to see some of his watercolours at Dulwich Picture Gallery.

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Yet again I was blown away by his work.  He makes it all look so easy yet you know that if you have a go just how quickly you can muck it up.  His use of colour is incredible and the simplicity to the work was stunning, so effective.  His work really shows you how important it is to remember that everything is a shape and that nothing is a line.  His decision in what to define and what to loosen up is key to the work.  One can be so tempted to define everything as our eyes tend to want to do that.  This takes away the magic.  When you see his work it makes you realise how much of what you see isn’t in detail and that you don’t need to see everything in so much detail, it is not important.

Sergeant fountain web

His composition is also very interesting.  One has a habit of wanting to include everything but instead he chooses very small key areas of the subject which you can see here in the fountain that he did.  The whole fountain is not included but that doesn’t matter, the cherubs are the beautiful part of the fountain – the rest is not so important.  He also shows this with the background.  It can be very easy to get caught up on the background of something you are painting, thinking that it is good to record everything.  Here Sargent paints a really simple and washed out background because what he wants is for you to concentrate on the fountain.  Painting in a really detailed background would just distract you from the main reason for the painting.  This is what I really like about his portraits.  Sargent is so clever at putting detail into the most important part of the portraits – the face.  The rest of the portraits are so loosely done, with huge brush strokes giving the audience an impression. This really draws your eye into their faces just like you are really drawn into this fountain.

This exhibition is on at the Dulwich Picture Gallery.  If you are near, I think its a great exhibition and a must see!

Suffolk Landscapes

Suffolk gravestones webIt has been such beautiful weather here in the UK for the last week or two. My mother really kindly invited me for a couple of days away in Suffolk where we could get on with some painting.  I haven’t really been able to use my new art box much yet as its been a busy summer with cousins.  With my son away we had plenty of time to paint.  It was the first time I had ever painted plein air so the whole experience was pretty scary to begin with.  There was a lovely graveyard nearby which we painted first.  The light was lovely on the gravestones creating lovely shadows.

suffolk landscape web

The second day was spent painting a typical view of the fields in Suffolk with wonderful grass in the foreground, stubble fields with bales and lovely trees and hedges.  I decided to use really small canvasses as I really like small paintings at the moment.  They are easy to place on bookshelves and great to put together as a montage on a wall.  I had never painted this small before and wanted to give it a go.  I was quite pleased with the result in the end.  I’m feeling thoroughly inspired now by the countryside and every time I get in the car I’m finding great locations.  If only I had more time.  The art box was a brilliant buy too.  I’m thrilled with it.

The Lady in Blue

 

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For the last couple of weeks I have been painting a portrait of this women in blue.  I thought that it might be a fun thing to show how the process works.  It’s often fun to take photos along the way so you can see the all the mistakes you have made and the progression – hopefully!

It’s important to put a wash on your canvas/board first to knock the white away as it can be distracting.  Then take your time to draw your portrait in a dark colour making sure you double check your proportions.  Then find the shadow shapes and draw them and fill them in thinly.  To get the likeness of someone concentrate on the 5 essential darks which are under the eyebrows, eyes, under the nose, top lip and under the bottom lip. Now add skin tone.  Start painting in the colour that features the most which would be the middle tone.  At this point avoid the shadow shapes as you have already blocked those in.  As you go along its alway good to tweak the lines and shapes making sure that all the way along the process you are getting proportions right.  Start to add in the highlights and make sure you leave all the details to the last sitting.

Good Luck!