Beetles and Hot Wheels

This week we had a chance to go to another brilliant exhibition in London.  This was at the Wellcome Collection in Euston.  The exhibition was really lovely and something that Kea and myself thoroughly enjoyed.  It was called ‘A Museum of Modern Nature’.  The exhibition was all about modern nature and what it means in todays life and times.  Londoners were asked to bring in things from nature that meant something to them.  There were exhibits from all ages and all aspects of life.  There were some really beautiful objects and some really bizarre things too.

carsbeetles

One of the items that a graphic designer brought in was a load of hot wheel cars.  He said how he always had this urge to collect them and put them into a pattern. He couldn’t quite understand why he was doing it and what it reminded him of.  He then realised it reminded him of when he was young when he used to collect beetles and put them into beautiful colourful patterns.

Kea loved the idea of the patterns that could be made out of the cars and or beetles.  He hadn’t really thought of the idea of putting his cars into patterns or even thinking of them in terms of colour.  This inspired him to look at his cars differently.  He came home and immediately started playing around with cars and patterns.  This is what he created.

Kea car pattern web

Cars are not just for racing and life is full of colour wherever you look.

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Wonderful Singer Sargent

Sargent is a hero of mine.   I find his work inspirational, exciting and so beautiful.  Most of the work I have seen are of his oil paintings and its mainly his portraits that really float my boat.  However this last week I have been to see some of his watercolours at Dulwich Picture Gallery.

sergeant crocs web

Yet again I was blown away by his work.  He makes it all look so easy yet you know that if you have a go just how quickly you can muck it up.  His use of colour is incredible and the simplicity to the work was stunning, so effective.  His work really shows you how important it is to remember that everything is a shape and that nothing is a line.  His decision in what to define and what to loosen up is key to the work.  One can be so tempted to define everything as our eyes tend to want to do that.  This takes away the magic.  When you see his work it makes you realise how much of what you see isn’t in detail and that you don’t need to see everything in so much detail, it is not important.

Sergeant fountain web

His composition is also very interesting.  One has a habit of wanting to include everything but instead he chooses very small key areas of the subject which you can see here in the fountain that he did.  The whole fountain is not included but that doesn’t matter, the cherubs are the beautiful part of the fountain – the rest is not so important.  He also shows this with the background.  It can be very easy to get caught up on the background of something you are painting, thinking that it is good to record everything.  Here Sargent paints a really simple and washed out background because what he wants is for you to concentrate on the fountain.  Painting in a really detailed background would just distract you from the main reason for the painting.  This is what I really like about his portraits.  Sargent is so clever at putting detail into the most important part of the portraits – the face.  The rest of the portraits are so loosely done, with huge brush strokes giving the audience an impression. This really draws your eye into their faces just like you are really drawn into this fountain.

This exhibition is on at the Dulwich Picture Gallery.  If you are near, I think its a great exhibition and a must see!