Pop up Exhibition

pop up exhibition

Over the last couple of weeks I have had a couple of exhibitions which I have been rather worried about.  It feels like a big step to go out there to sell your work when you are so unsure of it in the first place.  It’s hard as an artist I think to really believe in your work.  It’s hard to see the good things.  Instead we see all the mistakes and where we could improve.

Exhibiton pop up 2

I have been totally shocked and astounded by the way my work has been received over the last couple of weeks.  I have had so much positive feed back and people have been so kind.  It’s been quite a learning curve. Somehow its still so hard to believe that people like your work and want to buy it.  It’s an amazing boost and helps me to realise that despite all the mistakes I see, someone else likes and enjoys them.  Some of these paintings have been around my house for quite a while – I’m so excited and pleased that they have been sold, but I will also miss them.

Thank you very much for your support.

 

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Exhibition Time!

Ploughed Field

Morning Light on a Felsted walk – 5″x 7″ oil on board
Framed (dark wood tray frame) –  £100

I’ve been really busy this week finishing off work for an exhibition I have in Essex UK on the 24th November for a week.  Its an exhibition of Essex landscapes of which I’ve painted 10.  It’s been great working on these, I’ve really enjoyed it with the challenging light, colours and skies.  All 10 paintings are tiny – the biggest being around A5 size. It’s been a learning curve as I’ve never painted landscapes before.  I’ve taken it slowly and tried to concentrate on the good old formula of starting dark and then continuing  into the lights.  I also found out a good tip about giving the sky a wash of pink first which gives it more depth.  It definitely works.

If you are around and you can make it to Essex, I would be delighted if you came to my exhibition.  The details are below.

Exhibition flyer

 

 

Clementines

Clementines web

Clementines – linen on board 10″x6″ £60 unframed

It’s been a while since I posted a blog I realise.  Life has been very busy with styling, people staying, my flatmate leaving and working towards an exhibition I have at the end of November.  I’m still managing to paint most days which is good and here is an example of one of my paintings from the last week or so.

The studio has a very dark grey background.  It’s painted that way so that you can easily see the intensity of colours and the warmth and coolness of what you are painting.  After a while though it can get very boring to paint.  For this subject matter it was perfect.  The intense orange and warmth was very clear to see.  The plate that they sat on was a little more complicated as it was a real mixture of warm and cold. Getting these right is really essential for creating the three dimensional feel of it.  From this bowl you can see that the clementines were lit with a warm light from the left, but that there was a cool light (daylight) creeping in from the left.  This is where the coolness of the grey background really helps you to distinguish this .

I’m very pleased to say that many of my pieces of work will be in Homes Garden (UK) January 2018 issue which will be out on the 30th November so please do keep an eye out for them leaning up in one the houses.

All my paintings are for sale.  You can find them at AlicesArtHouse on Esty.com

Donkey Work

portrait girl 1

This was another chance to do a charcoal portrait.  I did this one at school where I had the opportunity to have a model sit for me for 3 hours.  Sadly I didn’t have 3 hours as I was late!  I gave myself the challenge of drawing from a donkey.  This is a lower bench that you can sit on so that when drawing you can get very close up from underneath the model.  This makes it quite a bit harder as the angle is very difficult.  The usual way of mapping out a face completely changes here.  The nose and eyes and mouth are much closer together and all the shapes change.  Personally I really prefer portraits from this angle – there is something rather grand about the pose.  It can be really hard to get this right.  I wish I had another couple of hours on it.  I love the mood of charcoal portraits.

Back to School

Well its back to school now.  I go to art school two mornings a week.  It’s good to go to school so that someone can keep an eye on what you are doing ;).  Everyone needs a little guidance now and then and someone to give you a good critique and get you back to basics if you are straying in the wrong direction.

This week my teacher wanted me to get back to basics again and make sure I knew what was dark and light, making sure I wasn’t being wowed by the colours and getting in a muddle about what was the darkest object and the lightest.  I was only allowed to use charcoal and I brought in with me a pear, apple and a plum.

Pear, apple and plum

Charcoal pear, apple and plum.  I was quite pleased with my charcoal handling which can often be a nightmare!

You can easily get in a muddle when you paint with colour because colours can be so vivid and saturated that you can often be tricked into thinking they are light.  One of the ways to make sure you have the light and dark correct is by using your phone.  Take a picture of the objects in black and white and you will soon realise that a lot of these colours that we see as bright colours we automatically think are light but actually they can be quite dark.  A great example of this is to take a photo of a lemon and an orange.

The other lesson on Wednesday was to decide on edges. Which ones should be blurred and which should be sharp.  Our eyes think we see everything very sharply but actually there is a lot our eyes make up.  As I’ve said before this is something that Singer Sargent does really well.  I love soft edges.

 

Ruby

This week has been a little difficult as Kea has been really unwell with a stomach bug.  He has been off school all week poor thing feeling rotten.  Luckily in-between looking after him I have had a chance to carrying on painting while he has watched films or slept.

I’ve been concentrating on a portrait I said I would do for someone.  She is called Ruby.  I had to do this portrait from a photo as I don’t actually know Ruby.  I was given a selection of photos to do it from and the one I chose was this one.

Ruby web

I double checked with her mother if there were any of the photos she didn’t like so much or one that she preferred and she assured me that she liked all of them.  I chose this particular pose because I felt out of all the photos this was where she looked the most natural.  I got on with the job.

I finished most of it and decided to send a photo of what I had done so far to Ruby’s mother and sadly I got a response asking if I could paint the arm out.  Sadly it isn’t quite as easy as ‘paint the arm out’ as this would totally change the lighting and shadows etc and it would mean making up half of her face which is never easy to do.  I can understand what she means as I know she would like a clean portrait of her daughter, but then on the other hand I rather like the arm, giving it a much more relaxed feel.  It is more unusual to have a portrait like this but I think it gives it something different, a contemporary felt .  What do you think about it?

I can’t paint out the arm and will give her the painting tonight.  I hear that Ruby likes it with the arm, I just hope her mother won’t be too disappointed.

Wonderful Singer Sargent

Sargent is a hero of mine.   I find his work inspirational, exciting and so beautiful.  Most of the work I have seen are of his oil paintings and its mainly his portraits that really float my boat.  However this last week I have been to see some of his watercolours at Dulwich Picture Gallery.

sergeant crocs web

Yet again I was blown away by his work.  He makes it all look so easy yet you know that if you have a go just how quickly you can muck it up.  His use of colour is incredible and the simplicity to the work was stunning, so effective.  His work really shows you how important it is to remember that everything is a shape and that nothing is a line.  His decision in what to define and what to loosen up is key to the work.  One can be so tempted to define everything as our eyes tend to want to do that.  This takes away the magic.  When you see his work it makes you realise how much of what you see isn’t in detail and that you don’t need to see everything in so much detail, it is not important.

Sergeant fountain web

His composition is also very interesting.  One has a habit of wanting to include everything but instead he chooses very small key areas of the subject which you can see here in the fountain that he did.  The whole fountain is not included but that doesn’t matter, the cherubs are the beautiful part of the fountain – the rest is not so important.  He also shows this with the background.  It can be very easy to get caught up on the background of something you are painting, thinking that it is good to record everything.  Here Sargent paints a really simple and washed out background because what he wants is for you to concentrate on the fountain.  Painting in a really detailed background would just distract you from the main reason for the painting.  This is what I really like about his portraits.  Sargent is so clever at putting detail into the most important part of the portraits – the face.  The rest of the portraits are so loosely done, with huge brush strokes giving the audience an impression. This really draws your eye into their faces just like you are really drawn into this fountain.

This exhibition is on at the Dulwich Picture Gallery.  If you are near, I think its a great exhibition and a must see!